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Archive for the ‘INFERTILITY ISSUES’ Category

Results from a 5 year Japanese study indicate that Pycnogenol or French maritime pine bark extract is an extremely effective natural treatment for endometriosis without dangerous side effects. The study found Pycnogenol was effective in reducing symptoms of endometriosis, such as pelvic pain and menstrual pain, according to the results reported in the March 2007 issue of the Journal of Reproductive Medicine. (more…)

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pregnant2.jpgFirst published in ‘O’  Magazine February, 2004. Available on this blog with kind permission of Barbara Seaman.
When Louise Brown, the world’s first test-tube baby, was born, in 1978, no one followed the news reports with more excitement than Liz Tilberis, then a 30-year-old fashion editor at British Vogue. After several years of trying to get pregnant, she and her husband, Andrew, had not been able to conceive. Although Tilberis had been told repeatedly that she was simply working too hard, she consulted a London gynecologist who prescribed three cycles of Clomid, a workhorse of a drug that stimulates the ovaries (the doctor referred to it only as a “fertility booster”). (more…)

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by Joanna Perlman

First published in ‘O’ (Oprah) Magazine February, 2004.
Published on this blog with kind permission of Joanna Perlman.

“$20,000 for eggs.” The ad in my Barnard College newspaper definitely caught my attention. It was posted by an infertile couple looking for a Jewish Ivy League student with good SAT scores. Although I was tempted, I decided not to respond. (more…)

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First published in ‘O’ (Oprah) Magazine February, 2004.
Published on this website with kind permission of Barbara Seaman.

When Louise Brown, the world’s first test-tube baby, was born, in 1978, no one followed the news reports with more excitement than Liz Tilberis, then a 30-year-old fashion editor at British Vogue. After several years of trying to get pregnant, she and her husband, Andrew, had not been able to conceive. Although Tilberis had been told repeatedly that she was simply working too hard, she consulted a London gynecologist who prescribed

(more…)

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Bee Propolis May Improve Infertility Associated With Mild Endometriosis by Emma Hitt, PhD

 Bee propolis appears to be effective for the treatment of infertility associated with mild endometriosis, according to the findings of a small randomized trial. Propolis is derived from plant resins collected by honeybees. According to Ali F. M. Ali, from the Ain Shams University, in Cairo, Egypt, and colleagues, the substance has “many pharmacologic actions,” including inhibition of C aromatase and vascular endothelial growth factor as well as strong anti-inflammatory activity. Dr. Ali and colleagues presented their findings this week at the 59th annual meeting of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine in San Antonio, Texas. The researchers conducted a study of 40 patients with primary infertility for at least two years and endometriosis diagnosed with laparoscopy. Patients were randomized to receive 500 mg of bee propolis twice daily or a placebo and were followed for nine months. Of the patients taking bee propolis, 12 women (60%) became pregnant compared with four (20%) in the placebo group(P < .001).
” The compliance of patients was satisfactory with no reported side effects,” the authors note in their abstract.
The researchers conclude that “bee propolis is an effective line of treatment for infertility associated with mild or minimal endometriosis.” They point out that their research was a pilot study with a limited number of patients, but that the results indicate that a “multicenter prospective trial of bee propolis is warranted.” ASRM 2003 Annual Meeting: Abstract O-84. Presented Oct. 13, 2003. Reviewed by Gary D. Vogin, MD

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